Appetisers/ Sides and Sauces

Artichokes alla Romana | Italian Flair

Artichokes alla Romana

Artichokes are a popular vegetable in Italian cuisine, particularly in the Lazio region. Fresh Artichokes Alla Romana is one of the two representative dishes of this area. We discovered this very simple dish whilst exploring Ostia, the ancient port on the Tiber Estuary.

It is easy to find artichokes popping up in the markets in Italy starting from cool November all the way through to early spring in April. In other countries, they are not as plentiful fresh. We resorted to the bottled variety. The dish is easy to make and can be served as part of an Antipasti or even as a side salad for a barbecue or Tapas.

Artichokes alla Romana

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By Marc Spendlove-Kruger Serves: 4
Prep Time: 10 Minutes Cooking Time: 60 Minutes

Roman style artichokes is a traditional Roman dish. More precisely it’s a tasty side dish, usually served with meats, especially lamb. In many Italian restaurants, Roman-style artichokes are even served as an appetizer.

Ingredients

  • 1 Large Jar of Artichokes preserved in Olive Oil
  • 1/2 Lemon Squeezed
  • 1 Tbs Fresh Parsley Chopped
  • 3 Tbs Fresh Mint Chopped
  • 1 Clove Garlic Finely Chopped
  • 2 Tbs Fresh Breadcrumbs Coarsely Chopped
  • Salt and Ground Black Pepper to taste

Instructions

1

Using a sieve, strain the oil from the preserved Artichokes

2

Combine the rest of the ingredients and mix well

3

Allow resting for approx one hour so the flavours infuse

4

Serve and enjoy

Artichokes Alla Romana, Roman-style artichokes, is a classic yet simple recipe from Rome where artichokes are filled with fragrant herbs then braised. They result in the most tender and flavoursome artichokes that will change your mind about this often intimidating vegetable forever. In just a few steps and with only a handful of ingredients, you can create Artichoke Alla Romana. This will bring in the Roman feel to any happy gathering.

Artichokes or Carciofi, are native to the Mediterranean. They were first mentioned in Italian cuisine as far back as the 16th century.

 

 

 

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